gamiila: (camera)
[personal profile] gamiila
Back in 2005, [livejournal.com profile] curiouswombat and [livejournal.com profile] frimfram set up a community and called it [livejournal.com profile] wild_photos, where members post and share photos of where they live on days referred to as Where I Live Days. These days occur with irregular frequency, usually about 2 years apart.

I have participated in these WILDays from the start, and when another was announced for this weekend, I betook myself and my mobile phone to Delft, a town not far from where I actually live, on a day that the sun was out and made everything look so much better.

What follows are the pictures that I took and posted in the community, so those of you who have already seen them may want to skip this post. As to the others, let me take you on a tour of Delft's two main churches.

Delft01
The steeple in this picture belongs to the church we'll visit first: the New Church, dating from 1351 in its oldest parts.


Delft02
On my way to the New Church, I passed this parish church of Mary of Jesse, as it's called, a fine example of late 19th century neogothic architecture.

Delft03
The doors to this church.

Delft04
A blue heart on a little square - I didn't get it until I read the slogan over on the Tourist Information Centre "Delft, the Blue Heart!" Blue for Delftware, of course.

Delft05
Interior of the New Church (originally St. Ursula's), closely associated with the House of Orange, that inters its members here.

Delft06
A corner of the interior.

Delft07
A portrait in stained glass, of William of Orange, aka the Silent, founder of the House of Orange and buried in this church.

Delft08
But it's not all royalty that's buried here: Delft has also honoured its favoured sons, as in this case, Hugo de Groot, or Grotius; who in the 17th century laid the foundations for maritime and international law.

Delft09
After William the Silent was assassinated in Delft in 1584, the war of independence from Spain that he had led raged on, but in the early 1600s during a lull in the fighting the States-General ordered his tomb to be made the most opulent and modern for its day, to honour the 'Pater Patriae'.

Delft10
Statue of William the Silent, by Hendrick de Keyser.

Delft11
Monument to King William I (son of stadhouder William V) - made in Brussels in 1849. That struck me as a little ironic, as it was during William's reign that Belgium seceded from the Netherlands in 1830...

Delft12


Delft13
View across the nave. The rope demarcates the entrance to the Royal Vaults, which is covered with a huge ornamented slab.

Delft14
Stained glass window.

Delft15
I'd never climbed up the tower, so I decided now was the time. Oh dear...it just went on and on...

Delft16

Delft17
I found a little door when I was halfway up, and when I looked around me, I decided that halfway up was more than far enough for me.

Delft18

Delft19
However, it must be said that the view, of the town hall and the market place, is worth the climb!


Delft20
Back on terra firma!

Delft21
The old guildhall of the St.Lucas Guild (painters), which now houses the Vermeer Information Centre.

Delft22
A street corner.

Delft23
Another streetview.

Delft24
Taking a closer look.

Delft25
Exterior of the Old Church, formerly St. John's.

Delft26
Inside the Old Church.

Delft27
The main organ.

Delft28
I was suprised to see there was a second organ, too.

Delft29
No Delft church would be complete without a stained glass window dedicated to William the Silent...

Delft30
Funerary monument of Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, the 'Father of Microbiology'.

Delft31
Commemmorative plaque of Reinier de Graaf, the physician and biologist for whom the Graafian follicles are named.

Delft32
Gravestone of the painter Johannes Vermeer, perhaps Delft's most famous son.

Delft33
Interior of the church.

Delft34
A pretty scene on a stained glass window depicting the OT story of Moses. Here, he's taken from the rushes.


And this concludes our tour of Delft, for the present at least. Goodnight, y'all!
From:
Anonymous( )Anonymous This account has disabled anonymous posting.
OpenID( )OpenID You can comment on this post while signed in with an account from many other sites, once you have confirmed your email address. Sign in using OpenID.
User
Account name:
Password:
If you don't have an account you can create one now.
Subject:
HTML doesn't work in the subject.

Message:

 
Notice: This account is set to log the IP addresses of everyone who comments.
Links will be displayed as unclickable URLs to help prevent spam.

Profile

gamiila: (Default)
gamiila

December 2012

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30 31     

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios